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No More Essays! Rethinking What We Have Students Write in Our Courses

In this workshop, you will hear from faculty throughout the college about the writing assignments they give their students that elicit truly engaged and thoughtful work and that their students find challenging, rewarding, and fun. The purpose is to generate ideas about rethinking what and why we have students write in our courses. For example, instead of having students write “term papers” or “essays,” why not have them write short conference papers, book reviews, peer critiques, blogs, or other genres that you yourself write and that fit with your learning goals? We will first share with you what the research says about what students find meaningful and rewarding in their assignments. We will then share actual assignments from our courses that have worked well. Finally, we will wrap up with tips and discussion about revising or generating new writing assignments.

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TA and PostDoc Series: Active Learning

All of the recent research into learning and how learning occurs, points to the effectiveness and necessity of actively engaging students in the classroom. It is not enough for instructors to ‘show and tell’ information, answers, processes, etc.; students have to engage with the material and come up with their own interpretations, answers, steps and understandings. In this workshop we’ll learn some basic techniques to promote active learning in the classroom.

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Extending Discussion Beyond the Classroom

Have you ever needed to cut a vibrant discussion short at the end of class, only to find that we weren't able to tap into the same dynamic the following week? Maybe you've led a seminar where the students always took a long time to warm up to the discussion topic? Together we will identify some of the common difficulties with classroom discussion and investigate strategies and tools that can help to both initiate, and continue, the discussion beyond the classroom.

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"Small Teaching": Small Strategies = Big Impacts on Student Learning

Want to enhance or revitalize your teaching but worry that requires more time or energy than you have?  This workshop will introduce you to “Small Teaching” strategies that require minimal preparation and grading, have little to no impact on overall instructional time, and do NOT require an extensive course overhaul.   You will have the opportunity to develop and share small teaching plans for a current or upcoming course.

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TA and PostDoc Series: Teaching Inclusively

The pedagogical choices we make as instructors can have a major impact on the climate for learning in our classrooms. Join us as we explore instructional strategies that promote learning success through intentional course design. Inclusive teaching strategies strengthen the performance of all students and also function to lessen the generational divide in academic expectations.

 

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Teaching Students How to Learn

This workshop will draw from our Fall book discussions on Teach Students to Learn, by Sandra Maguire. What is preventing your students from performing according to expectations? McGuire argues that if you teach students how to learn and give them simple, straightforward strategies to use, they can significantly increase their learning and performance. The methods she proposes do not require restructuring courses or an inordinate amount of time to teach. They can often be accomplished in a single session, transforming students from memorizers and regurgitators to students who begin to think critically and take responsibility for their own learning. Let’s discuss some of Maguire’s strategies and how we might apply them to better help our students to learn.

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TA and PostDoc Series: Interactive Lecturer

The research is clear, people learn best when actively engaged-how can you bring this interactivity to your teaching?

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Using VoiceThead to Increase Out-of-Class Foreign Language Practice

This workshop will provide you with a hands-on experience creating a mini-project for your course. You will see diversified examples from different language courses using VoiceThreads designed to prompt a variety of practices outside the classroom. You will also try several of VoiceThread's newer features, such as doodling for student engagement enhancement and comment moderation for assessment delivery via VoiceThread. Bring your laptop with you!.

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TA and PostDoc Series: Writing a Teaching Philosophy 1

If you intend to apply for academic positions, it is likely that you will be asked to submit your philosophy of teaching statement as part of your application. During this session, we’ll examine sample philosophies and evaluate them using a rubric developed at the University of Michigan. We will also discuss format and style expectations and you will begin articulating your ideas and values around teaching. This will assist you in crafting a teaching philosophy that effectively communicates who you are as a teacher.

 

 

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TA and PostDoc Series: Syllabus Design

This session focuses on helping you to create an effective syllabus that reflects your learning objectives, expectations, and university policies. We will identify appropriate syllabus components and explore strategies to help your students be more successful by creating a learner-centered syllabus.

 

 

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